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What Changed with the Law Being Put in Place (implemented) Bantu Education

The Bantu Education Act of 1953 was a major milestone in South African history. It was the first time that the government had legislated a policy that aimed to provide black South Africans with a segregated education system. This act was the foundation for the apartheid system and had a lasting impact on the education system of South Africa. In this article, we will explore what changed with the law being put in place for Bantu Education.

Pre-Bantu Education

Prior to the Bantu Education Act, the South African education system was segregated but not as strictly. Black South Africans had access to some education, although it was not on par with the education provided to white South Africans. The curriculum was also heavily focused on manual labor and domestic work, as opposed to academic subjects. This was largely due to the limited resources and funding available to black South Africans.

Impact of Bantu Education

The Bantu Education Act had a significant impact on the South African education system. The act was designed to create a system of segregated education where black South Africans would be taught a different curriculum than white South Africans. The curriculum was heavily focused on manual labor and domestic work, with little emphasis on academic subjects. This was largely due to the fact that the government believed that black South Africans would not benefit from an academic education.

The Bantu Education Act also had a major impact on the quality of education available to black South Africans. The quality of the schools, teachers, and resources available to black South Africans was significantly lower than that of white South Africans. This had a major impact on the quality of education black South Africans were receiving, and had a lasting impact on the development of the black South African population.

The Bantu Education Act of 1953 had a major impact on South African education. It was the first time that the government had legislated a policy that aimed to provide black South Africans with a segregated education system. This act was the foundation for the apartheid system and had a lasting impact on the education system of South Africa. The act had a major impact on the quality of education available to black South Africans and had a lasting impact on the development of the black South African population.

The Bantu Education Act of 1953 marked a major shift in the South African educational system. The Act was brought in as an attempt to further separate the races and introduce an educational system that catered solely to black South Africans. The Act changed the face of the South African education system, and its effects can still be seen today.

The idea behind the Bantu Education Act was to ensure that black South African’s had access to education that was of a low standard and that was limited in scope. The Act saw the main purpose of Black education as providing a workforce that delivered cheap labor, rather than producing educated members of society. It resulted in the closure of thousands of schools in the rural areas and the introduction of the Bantu schools.

The Bantu Education Act also limited the curriculums that could be taught in these schools and standardised syllabuses. The syllabuses only included courses that were deemed to be beneficial to manual workers and as a result, courses such as engineering, advanced mathematics and language were all dropped in favour of mechanical drawing, civics and simple arithmetic. This had serious implications for the education of black South Africans, as the quality of education that these students were receiving was drastically reduced.

Furthermore, Bantu Education also stripped black South Africans of any control over the education system. It removed the local justices from the position of educational power and paved the way for the Minister of native affairs to take control. This move was seen by many as an attempt to limit black South African’s individual and collective power, as well as to increase their dependence on the state.

The impact of the Bantu Education Act of 1953 can still be seen in South Africa today. It drastically altered the educational landscape, leaving thousands of black students without access to quality education. Furthermore, it opened the door to the disparity between the education received by white and black South Africans. This disparity has remained an issue in South Africa, and the legacy of the Bantu Education Act still lingers in South African society today.

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